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Lion Cannoneer

Otto Dix, German, (December 2, 1891–July 25, 1969)

Creation date: 1914

Other Information

Type: Oil Painting
Medium and Support: Oil on paper mounted on paperboard mounted on plywood
Credit Line: Gift from the Estate of Vance E. Kondon and Liesbeth Giesberger.
Accession Number: 2011.90
Dimensions: 27 1/4 in. x 25 1/4 in. (69.22 cm x 64.14 cm)

Label Copy

Dix served as a machine gunner in the German army in World War I and knew at first hand war’s ability to dehumanize humanity: to turn men into beasts. Nowhere is that idea clearer than in this painting, which shows one of Dix’s fellow artillerymen, the Cannoneer Löwe. Playing on the man’s name—Löwe means “lion” in German—Dix has transformed his companion, giving him the fierce feline features of his namesake. The man emerges from a hot orange glow, and both the rough brushstrokes and the unpainted margins of the board are surely meant to give the impression that this was the man as glimpsed in the heat of a battle.
Last Updated: 6/20/2016

Exhibition

This object was included in the following exhibitions:

Early 20th Century German Art from the Vance E. Kondon Collection , 1/28/1984 - 3/11/1984

The Human Beast San Diego Museum of Art , 7/21/2012 - 11/11/2012

American: Art of the 20th Century San Diego Museum of Art , 1/18/2014 - 8/26/2014

Art of the 20th Century , 3/28/2015 - 8/16/2015

German Expressionism San Diego Museum of Art , 7/23/2016 - 00/00/00

Bibliography

This object has the following bibliographic references:

Mr. Steven L. Brezzo and Ida Katherine Rigby. Early 20th Century German Art from the Vance E. Kondon Collection The San Diego Museum Art. January 1984
Page Number: 8, 10

Marks

Inscription, Upper right:

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