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Image of Majnun watches the battle of the clans

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Bookmark: https://collection.sdmart.org/objects-1/info/5293

Majnun watches the battle of the clans


Creation date: ca. 1510
Creation place: Iran

Other Information

Type: Manuscript Painting
Medium and Support: Opaque watercolor on paper
Credit Line: Gift of Edwin Binney 3rd
Accession Number: 1971.60
State/Province: Fars Province
Dimensions: 7 9/16 in. x 5 in. (19.21 cm x 12.7 cm)

Provenance

H.K. Monif, New York, New York ( - Janaury 23, 1963)

Edwin Binney 3rd, San Diego, California (Janaury 23, 1963 - December 21, 1971)

San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California (December 21, 1971 - )

Label Copy

June 2007
Lyric Visions
The tribal leader Naufal, on the large camel in the center of the composition, tries to force Leyli's family into allowing her to marry Majnun by defeating the warriors of her tribe in battle. Although the battle was intended to help Majnun become united with his beloved, Majnun is appalled by the carnage and gesticulates wildly as he looks on. Instead of supporting the side fighting on his behalf, he prays for their opponents, for they are the family and friends of Leyli. "How can I wield a sword when the enemy is my beloved?" He asks. The battle is to no avail, and Majnun returns to the wilderness in disgust.
The great banners that flutter above the borders of the painting are emblems of the opposing tribal groups. The camels indicate that the story is originally of the Arab Bedouin people of the deserts. The scattered plants over the pale colored landscape are a typical feature of Persian painting, for the artists were disinclined to leave undecorated plain expanses of color.

Sonya Quintanilla (2014) Quebec
Majnun watches the battle of the clans
From a Khamsa («Quintet») of Nizami
Iran, Shiraz, ca. 1510
Opaque watercolor on paper. 19.21 x 12.7 cm
Gift of Edwin Binney 3rd, 1971.60

The tribal leader Naufal, on the large camel in the center of the composition, tries to force Leyli's family into allowing her to marry Majnun by defeating the warriors of her tribe in battle. Although the battle was intended to help Majnun become united with his beloved, Majnun is appalled by the carnage and gesticulates wildly as he looks on. Instead of supporting the side fighting on his behalf, he prays for their opponents, for they are the family and friends of Leyli. «How can I wield a sword when the enemy is my beloved?» he asks. The battle is to no avail, and Majnun returns to the wilderness in disgust.

The great banners that flutter above the borders of the painting are emblems of the opposing tribal groups. The camels indicate that the story is originally of the Arab Bedouin people of the deserts. The scattered plants over the pale colored landscape are a typical feature of Persian painting, for the artists were disinclined to leave undecorated plain expanses of color.
Last Updated: 9/5/2017

Exhibition

This object was included in the following exhibitions:

Islamic Art from the Edwin Binney Collection Phoenix Art Museum , 3/18/1977 - 5/1/1977

Lyric Visions from Nizami's "Quintet" , 6/14/2007 - 11/4/2007

Into India: South Asian Paintings from The San Diego Museum of Art San Diego Museum of Art , 2/28/2012 - 5/27/2012

Bibliography

This object has the following bibliographic references:

Dr. Sonya Quintanilla and Patrick Coleman. Visiones de la India Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza. Madrid, 2012
Page Number: 104, 271, Figure Number: cat. 42, p. 105

Dr. Sonya Quintanilla and Patrick Coleman. Visiones de la India (Mexico) Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia. Mexico , 2013
Page Number: 153, Figure Number: cat. 42, p. 161

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